How do I choose a KV motor?

Is a lower kV motor better?

Generally speaking the more Kv a motor has, the more RPM and more power. For example, a 9000Kv motor would be faster than a 2200Kv motor. … A higher turn number means more wire and thus more resistance, resulting in a slower motor. So turns with a lower number means a faster motor.

How do I know what size electric motor to buy?

To determine the technical specifications, it will be necessary to determine the power, torque and speed of the motor. In order to determine the size, you must know how much space the motor will take up and how it is mounted (i.e.how it will be fixed in the system).

Does higher kV mean more speed?

The kV rating is the RPM of the motor with no load, not the kilo-volt. A motor that has a higher kV will have more top end speed, but not as much Torque. A motor with a lower kV will have more power and will accelerate faster.

What Kv is a 10.5 motor?

Novak’s 10.5s are 4,200KV.

How many turns is a 3800kv motor?

If you are going to race the 13.5T class than you will need to buy a 13.5T motor. The Castle 3800 is about a 10.5T 11T in terms on power to turn for the motor.

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How many turns is a 3300kv motor?

3300 is 13.5 equiv if it were a Novak motor.

What does 12T mean on RC Motors?

Twelve turns around each motor pole using triple wires. Three wires are would twelve times around the pole. A 12T double would use two wires wound twelve times and a 12T single a single thicker wire wound twelve times around each rotor pole.

How do I choose motor power?

There are several characteristics that you need pay attention to when selecting a motor but voltage, current, torque, and velocity (RPM) are most important. Current is what powers the motor and too much current will damage the motor. For DC motors, operating and stall current are important.

How do you choose motor power?

A constant or variable torque and horsepower will be required for the industrial motor depending on the type of load the motor is driving. The size of the load, the required speed, and acceleration/deceleration—particularly if it’s fast and/or frequent—will define the torque and horsepower that is required.